To love. To be loved. To never forget your own insignificance. To never get used to the unspeakable violence and the vulgar disparity of life around you. To seek joy in the saddest places. To pursue beauty to its lair. To never simplify what is complicated or complicate what is simple. To respect strength, never power. Above all, to watch. To try and understand. To never look away. And never, never to forget.

Arundhati Roy, The Cost of Living (via observando)

18:48

vanstanley:

captain-snark:

bananamerlin:

maderadearquitecto:

Thermochromic table by Jay Watson

imagine banging someone on that table

imagine being home alone and seeing imprints on that table

imagine if the guy never got up or moved at all and so he never realized that this was a special thermal imprint table, didn’t get to see what was so special, and instead stared into the distance lost in his thoughts, two cups of cold coffee, never to feel delight at the novelty of where he is sitting.

18:47
rryann:

culturedwind:

“As a lotus flower is born in water, grows in water and rises out of water to stand above it unsoiled, so I, born in the world, raised in the world having overcome the world, live unsoiled by the world” 
—Buddha 

i fucking love this quote

18:47

rryann:

culturedwind:

“As a lotus flower is born in water, grows in water and rises out of water to stand above it unsoiled, so I, born in the world, raised in the world having overcome the world, live unsoiled by the world”

—Buddha 

i fucking love this quote

(via flowersofgaia)

The idea that sex is something a woman gives a man, and she loses something when she does that, which again for me is nonsense. I want us to raise girls differently where boys and girls start to see sexuality as something that they own, rather than something that a boy takes from a girl.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (NPR)

(via sunflower-mama)

18:43
nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

18:43

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

(via npr)

What race are you?

18: 34
black people: black
white people: 2% greek 9.1% german .0000032% russian 92% irish 49% french 100% blue eyed devil
asian people: not chinese
18:33
garconniere:

hnnhmcgrth:

Tomoko Sawada

Tomoko Sawada’s ID400 (1998) was produced while she was a university student and living in Kobe. “The photo machine, a small vending machine-like contraption, can be found in numerous locations around the city.” Sawada spent weeks changing her physical appearance with make-up, clothing, and hairstyles, creating 400 different identities using a machine whose sole purpose is to produce stable images for official documents. The facial characteristics are so varied that the photographic project becomes a compelling study of physiognomy.
Going to see this in Montreal this week as part of le Mois de la Photo. Great that this is happening in the photobooth capital of the world… but that is slowly losing all of its film photobooths.

18:33

garconniere:

hnnhmcgrth:

Tomoko Sawada

Tomoko Sawada’s ID400 (1998) was produced while she was a university student and living in Kobe. “The photo machine, a small vending machine-like contraption, can be found in numerous locations around the city.” Sawada spent weeks changing her physical appearance with make-up, clothing, and hairstyles, creating 400 different identities using a machine whose sole purpose is to produce stable images for official documents. The facial characteristics are so varied that the photographic project becomes a compelling study of physiognomy.

Going to see this in Montreal this week as part of le Mois de la Photo. Great that this is happening in the photobooth capital of the world… but that is slowly losing all of its film photobooths.

(via posh-lost)

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